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2024 Eclipse In Ohio

The moon covers the sun during a total solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Cerulean, Ky. On April 8, 2024, the sun will pull another disappearing act across parts of Mexico, the United States and Canada, turning day into night for as much as 4 minutes, 28 seconds.
Timothy D. Easley
/
AP
The moon covers the sun during a total solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Cerulean, Ky. On April 8, 2024, the sun will pull another disappearing act across parts of Mexico, the United States and Canada, turning day into night for as much as 4 minutes, 28 seconds.

For the first time in more than two hundred years, Ohio will experience a total solar eclipse.

On the afternoon of Monday, April 8, the moon's shadow will slice a diagonal line from the southwest to the northeast across North America, briefly plunging communities along the track into darkness.

North America won’t experience totality again until 2033, but only in Alaska. The next isn't until 2044, when totality will be confined to Western Canada, Montana and North Dakota. There won’t be another U.S. eclipse, spanning coast to coast, until 2045.

It’s a once-in-a-lifetime event and tens of thousands of people are expected to flood into that zone of totality to see it happen.

When will the eclipse be visible in Ohio?
The path of totality for the eclipse will enter Ohio in the southwestern part of the state starting in New Paris on the Indiana border at 3:08 p.m., according to the website Great American Eclipse.

The eclipse will move northeast across the state. The last portion of the state that will be in the path of totality is Warren at 3:15 p.m.

What is totality?
The moon will line up perfectly between the Earth and the sun, blotting out the sunlight, according to The Associated Press.

By a cosmic stroke of luck, the moon will make the month’s closest approach to Earth the day before the total solar eclipse. That puts the moon just 223,000 miles away on eclipse day.

The moon will appear slightly bigger in the sky thanks to that proximity, resulting in an especially long period of sun-blocked darkness.

How do I safely watch the eclipse?
Sunglasses won’t cut it. Special eclipse glasses are crucial for safely observing the sun as the moon marches across the late morning and afternoon sky, covering more and more and then less and less of our star.

During totality when the sun is completely shrouded, it’s fine to remove your glasses and look with your naked eyes. But before and after, certified eclipse glasses are essential to avoid eye damage. Just make sure they’re not scratched or torn.

Cameras, binoculars and telescopes must be outfitted with special solar filters for safe viewing. Bottom line: Never look at an exposed sun without proper protection any day of the year.

Where can I get eclipse glasses?

The Columbus Metropolitan Library was distributing free glasses, but has run out of the free glasses.

Eyeglasses retailer Warby Parker will give away free eclipse glasses at its Easton Towne Center location starting on April 1.

The American Astronomical Society has compiled a list of reputable vendors that are selling eclipse glasses online.

What are some eclipse events that will be held?
Throughout Ohio, there will be many eclipse-watching parties.

In Central Ohio, Deleware County is in the path of totality and has many parks and outdoor venues to see the eclipse as well as the county fairgrounds.

The Associated Press reports the Armstrong Air and Space Museum in Wapakoneta, Ohio — Neil Armstrong’s hometown, will host an event and there will be eclipse-themed wedding ceremonies in Tiffin.

The website Festival Guide and Reviews has a long list of watch parties that will be held throughout Ohio.

2024 Eclipse Resources